Moscow you don't know at Ivan Pavlov's exhibition

April 15 at the Gilyarovsky Center, a branch of the Museum of Moscow, the exhibition “Never-Departing Moscow. Ivan Pavlov”

The Moscow you don't know is at Ivan Pavlov's exhibition

The Moscow you don't know is at Ivan Pavlov's exhibition Pavlova

April 15 at the Gilyarovsky Center, a branch of the Museum of Moscow, the exhibition “Never-Departing Moscow. Ivan Pavlov ". The Moscow artist and engraver Ivan Pavlov sought to preserve the image of a leisurely merchant city in his works. Cozy wooden streets, markets and paved pavements — the protagonists of Pavlov's woodcuts and linocuts filled with a sense of nostalgia and love for the city's history. For visitors to the exhibition — this is an opportunity to see Moscow, which they did not know.

At the end of XIX — At the beginning of the 20th century, the world was changing rapidly, and large-scale transformations were also taking place in the urban environment of Moscow, which at that time had not been the capital for two hundred years. Powerful industrialization, the emergence of high-rise buildings, cars and telephones, the renewal of the lifestyle in general — all this made many residents yearn for the disappearing old city.

The artist and engraver Ivan Pavlov, who lived in Zamoskvorechye, was one of those who were fascinated by the phenomenon of “leaving Moscow”. His cherished dream was “to spread the forgotten art of engraving and to represent the spirit of the old city through this art.” Preserving ancient streets, houses, temples and estates on paper, he not only recorded an important part of the history of the city, but also conveyed to the viewer his own perception. 

The works presented at the exhibition will rediscover the art of engraving for the public and allow take a different look at the usual architecture of the capital. The break gates, which, like part of the Kitaygorod wall, were demolished, the famous and beloved by Muscovites mushroom market, the monument to Alexander Pushkin, which was preserved, but moved to the other side of the square, — evidence of a former era, the memory of which was preserved by Ivan Pavlov. Thanks to the artist's works, you can see what is gone forever, and what remains is living proof of the changing, but “non-leaving Moscow”.

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